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Hip Injuries Specialists

Sports Medicine Oregon

Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine located in Tigard, OR & Wilsonville, OR

Not only does the hip joint bear the weight of your upper body, but it’s also responsible for all movement in your upper leg. As a result, the hips are especially vulnerable to damage and injury. At Sports Medicine Oregon in Tigard and Wilsonville, Oregon, the team of orthopedic surgeons diagnoses and treats a wide range of hip injuries. The practice also includes an onsite surgery center for individuals undergoing hip procedures. To learn more, call Sports Medicine Oregon or schedule an appointment online now.

Hip Injuries Q&A

What is the hip?

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint that serves two important functions. 

First, the joint supports the weight of the upper body. In addition, it helps move the upper leg, allowing you to walk, run, climb, and squat with ease. 

The joint consists of the femoral head — a ball-shaped bone at the top of the thigh bone — and a rounded socket.

What are the most common hip injuries?

Since you use your hips each time you stand or move, it’s susceptible to wear-and-tear, injury, and damage caused by degenerative conditions. Some of the most common hip injuries and conditions include:

Hip dislocation

When the hip dislocates, the head of the femur breaks away from the socket. If you have a posterior dislocation, the top of the thigh bone shifts outward. That straightens the leg and turns the knee inward. An anterior dislocation, which is less common, forces the thigh bone inward and turns the knee outward.

Hip fractures

Direct impact to the hip can lead to fractures in the bone. Fractures commonly occur when you dislocate your hip.

Hip bursitis

The bursae are fluid-filled sacs that allow your joints to move smoothly. If the bursae in your hip become damaged, infected, or inflamed, it can cause chronic pain.

Arthritis

Hip arthritis occurs when the cartilage surrounding the joint wears down. Over time, the bone can make direct contact with the surrounding bone and cause severe pain and poor mobility.

Hip impingement

Also known as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), hip impingement occurs when the femoral head pinches against the cup of the hip. That can lead to labral tears around the cartilage toward the outside of your hip joint.

Snapping hip syndrome

Snapping hip typically occurs if you have bone spurs. The muscles and tendons passing over these extra pieces of bone can become inflamed and irritated.

Avascular necrosis

Avascular necrosis, or AVN hip, is a very painful condition in which blood flow to the head of the femur becomes restricted. Without treatment, AVN can lead to death of the bone tissue.

What are the treatments for hip injuries?

Once your orthopedic surgeon at Sports Medicine Oregon performs a physical exam, they can better determine the cause of your hip injury. X-rays may also be necessary to accurately diagnose your condition.

Rest, ice, and physical therapy are essential for your recovery. Depending on your injury, your physical therapy plan may include specific stretches, exercises, massage, and more.

Regenerative injections can also help repair damage in your hip. While platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cell therapy contain biological substances to trigger your body’s natural healing response, prolotherapy uses a mixture of saline or sugar to promote recovery

Hip surgery is sometimes the best option to repair hip damage. While a severe injury may require a direct anterior hip replacement, hip impingement surgery typically treats cartilage damage by repairing the tissue and shaving your bone spurs.

Meanwhile, hip fracture surgery involves placing screws in your bone to promote healing. During hip resurfacing, your surgeon trims the head of the femur and places a metal covering.

In some cases, your surgeon can utilize arthroscopic surgery to repair damage without fully exposing the hip. These procedures often result in shorter recovery times and less pain.

To learn more, call Sports Medicine Oregon or schedule an appointment online now.